Neocolonial Fictions of the Global Cold War



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2019
Available: 
June, 2019
288 pages, 6 × 9 inches
Paper: 
$85.00
9781609386313
eBook, perpetual ownership: 
$85.00
9781609386320

Neocolonial Fictions distinguishes itself in the field of new Cold War studies by arguing that, at least in terms of culture and literature, the Cold War was not sui generis, but rather was distinguished by relations and dynamics that came into being long before 1946 and have, in many cases, continued to the present. The contributors read Cold War–era literature with an eye to decolonization, the civil rights movement in the U.S., the struggle for women’s liberation, and the metastasis of the bureaucratic state.”—Greg Barnhisel, author, Cold War Modernists: Art, Literature, and American Cultural Diplomacy 

Neocolonial Fictions is a welcome, worthwhile collection that takes seriously the centrality of world liberation movements in the making of a mid-century U.S. literary canon; as important, the anthology maps the afterlives of such movements and Cold War–engagements vis-à-vis the contemporary ‘War on Terror’ imaginary. Neocolonial Fictions is impressive and capacious.”
—Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, author, War, Genocide, and Justice: Cambodian American Memory Work 

Bringing together noted scholars in the fields of literary, cultural, gender, and race studies, this edited volume challenges us to reconsider our understanding of the Cold War, revealing it to be a global phenomenon rather than just a binary conflict between U.S. and Soviet forces. Shining a spotlight on writers from the war’s numerous fronts and applying lenses of race, gender, and decolonization, the essayists present several new angles from which to view the tense global showdown that lasted roughly a half-century. Ultimately, they reframe the Cold War not merely as a divide between the Soviet Union and the United States, but between nations rich and poor, and mostly white and mostly not. By emphasizing the global dimensions of the Cold War, this innovative collection reveals emergent forms of post-WWII empire that continue to shape our world today, thereby raising the question of whether the Cold War has ever fully ended.

Contributors: 

Kate Baldwin, Steven Belletto, Michele Hardesty, Cheryl Higashida, Andrew Hoberek, Crystal Parikh, Donald E. Pease, Adam Piette, John Carlos Rowe, Adam V. Spanos, William V. Spanos, Cedric Tolliver

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